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20130121
20130129
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
pockets, but we may be losing our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical
have been overly optimistic on the economy. and, we've seen autos really rebounding over the last year. we're really starting to see improvement in the housing market. so, i think those are some very fundamental pieces of the economy that could really lead to some stronger growth in the future. >> reporter: as for retail investors rediscovering stocks this january, not everyone thinks the reunion is for real. some experts say the market will have to rally a lot longer before that happens. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from a smartphone in your hand to a smartphone in your glasses, still ahead, the latest fashion trend: wearable technology. exxon-mobil is back on top. it's reclaimed the coveted title as the world's most valuable company. apple now slips to number two. exxon is woh an estimated $417 billion a apple is $4 billion less. since apple hit $700 a share in september. it has lost roughly $250 billion in value. the change comes exactly one year after the tech titan knocked the oil giant out of the top spot. shares of microsoft ended flat today, after posting quarte
've heard from our republican colleagues economic uncertainty is bad for the economy. guess what? it is. and yet that's exactly what you are doing. another big dose of economic uncertainty. >> reporter: republicans shifted gears on the debt ceiling after a strategy session last week. worried that they have lost the public debate, republicans were clearly trying out a new message tod. >> balancing the budget over the next ten years means we save the future for our kids and our grandkids. it also means that we strengthen programs like social security and medicare and medicaid that can't continue to exist in current form without some kind of controls. >> reporter: there is just one problem. democrats argue the "no budget no pay provision" violates the constitution's 27th amendment which says any changes congress makes in its pay can't take effect until after the next election. >> we should not say to a member, "if you think the budget before you is not good for the country, vote against it and you won't get paid. if you think it's not good for the country, you better vote for it because yo
want the sequester actually to go forward which would put the breaks on the economy at least to an extent and drive more people back into bonds. >> reporter: others say any return to bonds may be short- lived, as the u.s. economy is showing new signs of strength. >> i think we expect more improvements, moderate improvements. but, you know overall that's usually a cause or thought that rates could go higher. and, in that regard it's probably not a market that will have the same sort of returns that we've seen over the past two years. >> reporter: so, it seems most agree the bond market is unlikely to be a cash cow for investors going forward. at the same time, however, worries about a bond market bubble seem unfounded. suzanne pratt, "nightly business report." >> susie: immigration reform takes center stage this week. a group of senate democrats and republicans agreed today on what they called a framework for comprehensive immigration reform. tomorrow, president obama heads to las vegas to give a policy speech on immigration. with washington focused on immigration, citizenship
of the federal reserve, talks with us about the debt crisis, the economy and the fed. alan blinder joins us. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: just a single cent higher. earnings from software "giant" microsoft were only a penny more than what anysts were expecting. microsoft shares slipped as much as 2% on the news in after hours trading. here are the numbers: microsoft earned $0.76 a share, down 3.7% from a year ago. revenues rose more than 2.5% to $21.5 billion, but also below expectations. the results mark the first quarter to include sales of microsoft's new windows 8 operating system, and its tablet computer, the "surface". sales of its windows division jumped 24%, but no financial details on the surface tablet. wel haveore analysis on microsoft, in a just a moment. >> tom: the other big tech story today: apple and its big fall following yesterday's lackluster results. the stock lost 12% of its value or $63 a share, closing at $450 and change. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: no doubt this was a sour day for investors. not only did the stock log its largest dolla
, or maybe it's that the economy is finally building a stronger foundation. whatever the cause, the effect is that the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all are up more than 4% in the first three weeks of this year. wall street veteran art cashin says with interest rates still so low, investors have a new taste for equities, particularly pension funds. >> they've got to up their risk profile, and therefore they're going to buy stocks. and some of that money is coming in not wildly, not open-armed, but somewhat reluctantly. but this is the only road i can take. >> reporter: even with all the positive momentum on wall street, there's still a bit of nervousness about earnings season. less than 20% of s&p 500 names have reported, and so far the results are just okay. a close look at the numbers show 62% of companies have topped wall street expectations. that's in line with the average since 1994 but below the 65% of the past year. still, it's the red flags companies like dupont are raising about this year that are getting noticed. today, the largest u.s. chemical firm tempered expectations about its
where we are not really seeing other signs of the economy reinforce it. i'd like to see some reinforcing signals and we're not, but for the time being two weeks of numbers this low are very tantalizing. >> reporter: jobless claims are now at roughly the same level they were in early 2008. also, don't forget that up until this week's cold-weather snap, temperatures were unseasonably warm, letting builders continue projects in what would typically be snowy weather. >> temperatures have been above normal and typically when you do have above normal temperatures economic activity and in particular jobless claims do show some bias for exaggerated improvement that perhaps we may not get the layoffs that are typical around this year in particular in the construction industry. >> reporter: construction is expected to continue to be strong, estimates have the industry adding as many as 140,000 jobs this year, that's up from a meager 18,000 in 2012. but construction is just one sector, and, much like the weather in january, the jobs picture could go from hot to cold just as easily. ruben ramirez,
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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